Author Archives: desirehigher

Missing Time With the Family


I heard a brief blurb on TV the other day that mentioned that, since there are not enough childcare openings in the city, some parents are deciding to stay at home with their children.

While it is unfortunate they feel they are forced into this choice, I think they will find it is a great choice.  I used to be a stay-at-home mom and I loved it.

I miss being there to watch, guide, help, support, and have fun with my family.  Most of all, I miss all the time I had when I stayed at home!

Working full-time takes at least 10 hours out of my day (50 hours a week).  And the rest of my life must be squeezed into the remaining 14 hours a day (or 118 hours a week figuring 2 days off from work).

When you take the meals, dishes, wash, shopping, errands, appointments, and cleaning that we all have to do, there’s not much time left for everything else.  There are so many things that I just do not have time and/or energy for.

I used to be able to keep up with the house better, reach out to others more, plan better and more economical meals, work on hobbies or personal interests, even spend better quality time with my family!

And, while I hope to get back to those types of things when I retire, I find that my body may have other plans and refuse to keep up with me then!  🙂

 

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Oh, Sugar! Progress Report


You may remember the poem I came up with to encourage people to think about the words they use and say “Oh, sugar!” instead of using profanity or obscenities.  And then when people use God’s or Jesus’ name as an exclamation or a curse, I was going to start saying “I’m so glad you brought Him up.  He loves you so very much!”

I printed the poem and put it in a frame and put a pretty bowl of sugar cubes in front of it at my desk about a week before Thanksgiving.  And I still have it up along with some Christmas decorations now.

A good handful of people have noticed the sign or the sugar while I was around, so I invited them to read the poem and explained why the sugar cubes.  Everyone of them left with a smile, and most seemed to agree it was kind of cute.

Then today along came the perfect opportunity to try the 2nd part of my plan.  I was talking one-on-one with someone and as she described a recent painful event, she was suddenly exclaiming God’s name several times.

I couldn’t hold myself back.  I jumped in with, “Yes, God certainly was watching over you!” and as she continued, I went on with “Please don’t say that, God loves you so much!  Please stop saying ‘God’.  Don’t use His name in vain.”

So, I have broken the ice.  I hope to be more courageous now and to speak up in love when people misuse His name.  I want everyone to know that God is real, He loves you, and He knows who you are.  🙂

Here’s the poem again if you want to use it (I’m thinking of substituting Christmas for the word Thanksgiving now on my framed copy):

Thanksgiving is the perfect time

to give up words not sublime.

To drive those words right from your head,

try Grandma Pearson’s words instead:

“Oh, sugar!”

Thanksgiving Is the Perfect Time To Think About Our Words and Language Part 2


Yesterday in church it came to me what I can do when people use the Lord’s name as an exclamation or curse. 

I can say, “I’m so glad you brought Him up!  He really loves you!” 

🙂

(We’ll change this culture yet – one word at a time.  I printed my little poem from my last post, framed it, and put it by my desk at work with a bowl of sugar.  It has already gotten a couple of my co-workers to think about their words and use this one.)

 

Thanksgiving Is the Perfect Time To Think About Our Words and Language


Thanksgiving is the perfect time to think about the language we use and should be using.  Here’s an idea I had:

 

Thanksgiving is the perfect time

to give up words not sublime.

To drive those words right from your head,

try Grandma Pearson’s words instead:

“Oh, sugar!”

🙂

Thank You, Veterans!


As we approach Veterans Day – a day our country has set aside to honor our many and diverse veterans throughout its history – there are remembrances sitting at my desk.  A mug with pictures of eagles, the flag, and the words “Freedom is Not free”, pictures of an eagle flying with a flag, a house displaying the flag, the Statue of Liberty in front of a flag, and a small flag.

Today I also proudly wear my red, white, and blue necklace to show my love and respect for my country, my flag, and especially for the millions who have served them so well!  It is an honor to remember them and their many sacrifices.

I appreciate the freedoms we have and I strive to use them wisely.  I try to instill reverence, patriotism, and love among our citizens and rising generations so all may continue to benefit from the hard-fought efforts of not only our veterans, their families, and loves ones.

Thank you, Veterans!

Opioids – Where is the Voice of Reason?


Opioids – the name throws fear into the hearts of many!  Why?  Because most do not have much experience with it; therefore they do not understand it.  And, as with most things that we do not really know but hear a few tales about, they immediately jump to fear and apprehension, condemning that which they ought not.

For a people who go to great lengths to admonish against stereotyping, judging, prejudice, and bigotry, it is shocking to see how normal they feel stereotyping and judging people with chronic pain.  From their own bigoted and prejudiced, “holier than thou” stance they have turned on all those who struggle with debilitating medical conditions, condemning them as drug addicts who simply need to be detoxified in order for their lives to improve.

One such woman, manager at a pain clinic who ought to have known better, said, “Our goal is to get people off of opioids, and improve the quality of their lives.”  When asked, “What if it doesn’t improve the quality of their lives?”, she quickly responded, “Then, we failed.”  No remorse for those people, no concern for their well-being, nothing to offer them except, “Our goal is to get people off of opioids, and improve the quality of their lives.”

While that might be an admirable goal for some, there are those who will never be able to live pain-free, and for whom opioids are what improves the quality of their lives.  Indeed, opioids are enabling them to be alive; to continue to function; to keep from becoming totally disabled and bed-ridden, barely able to move, and weeping from the pain; even keeping their bodies from shutting down and requiring exorbitantamounts of time, effort, money, equipment, and resources (i.e. dialysis, care givers, etc.) to stay alive.

Of course, if we allow society to continue down this path that the media is laying out, without standing up to them, people will be coerced into living lives filled with pain, and forced to make unpleasant, downright dangerous choices to find relief.  They may well turn to such “therapeutic” choices as drinking, illicit drugs, dangerous levels of over-the-counter drugs, or even suicide to escape the incredible, never-ending, unfathomable pain.

And that puts us right back where we started, only worse, because now it is no longer by accident.

Where is the voice of reason?

Pain Team To The Rescue


A few years ago I talked with someone who worked as a pain specialist at a hospital.  She was part of a team that was there to help patients manage their pain.

I found that extremely interesting, and talked with her about their views of pain.

She pointed out that pain can be detrimental to a patient’s well-being.  It causes physical and physiological issues.  It can slow down healing, cause the patient to move around less which can cause muscle degeneration and greater chance of blood clots, increased sleeplessness, increased heart rate and blood pressure, stress, and loss of enjoyment of life.

These are some pretty serious issues.

She explained that they had discovered that if you work with the patient, explain the pain cycle, discuss expectations, alternatives, consequences, and choices, the patient knows what is happening, what to expect, and what the possibilities are for dealing with the pain that is there as well as in case of increased pain.

They have found that it is MUCH easier to stay on top of, and handle, a smaller amount of pain than it is to let the pain increase and get out of hand and THEN try to decrease it.  It then takes much longer to bring the pain back down, and it takes exponentially more effort and/or medication to get the pain under control.

Her team was there as a resource so the nurses could call on them anytime when a patient was having trouble getting pain controlled.  They could use their expertise and work with the patient to review possible ways to bring pain relief.

What a novel and refreshing thought process.  The Pain Team didn’t run away from pain, they dealt with it.  And the patients were able to recover faster, enjoy life more, and relax rather than feeling tense, worried, and stressed.

Brilliant!