Tag Archives: Thanksgiving

Oh, Sugar! Progress Report


You may remember the poem I came up with to encourage people to think about the words they use and say “Oh, sugar!” instead of using profanity or obscenities.  And then when people use God’s or Jesus’ name as an exclamation or a curse, I was going to start saying “I’m so glad you brought Him up.  He loves you so very much!”

I printed the poem and put it in a frame and put a pretty bowl of sugar cubes in front of it at my desk about a week before Thanksgiving.  And I still have it up along with some Christmas decorations now.

A good handful of people have noticed the sign or the sugar while I was around, so I invited them to read the poem and explained why the sugar cubes.  Everyone of them left with a smile, and most seemed to agree it was kind of cute.

Then today along came the perfect opportunity to try the 2nd part of my plan.  I was talking one-on-one with someone and as she described a recent painful event, she was suddenly exclaiming God’s name several times.

I couldn’t hold myself back.  I jumped in with, “Yes, God certainly was watching over you!” and as she continued, I went on with “Please don’t say that, God loves you so much!  Please stop saying ‘God’.  Don’t use His name in vain.”

So, I have broken the ice.  I hope to be more courageous now and to speak up in love when people misuse His name.  I want everyone to know that God is real, He loves you, and He knows who you are.  🙂

Here’s the poem again if you want to use it (I’m thinking of substituting Christmas for the word Thanksgiving now on my framed copy):

Thanksgiving is the perfect time

to give up words not sublime.

To drive those words right from your head,

try Grandma Pearson’s words instead:

“Oh, sugar!”

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Thanksgiving Is the Perfect Time To Think About Our Words and Language


Thanksgiving is the perfect time to think about the language we use and should be using.  Here’s an idea I had:

 

Thanksgiving is the perfect time

to give up words not sublime.

To drive those words right from your head,

try Grandma Pearson’s words instead:

“Oh, sugar!”

🙂

Happy Thanksgiving Eve!


It’s the evening before Thanksgiving.  We just finished watching Hallmark’s Operation Christmas, a warm and inspirational movie about helping our military families.

Watching it made me realize a lot more of what military families go through with their loved ones not only away from home but also in very dangerous situations.  It reminded me again of how very thankful I am to them and to all military personnel for the price they pay for the freedoms our country enjoys.

I am thankful to live in a country that has such great freedoms, and for the people and families who have given so much for us to have those freedoms.

At work they asked us to put together a PowerPoint slide of what we are thankful for.  I knew most people would mention the obvious things like their families and loved ones, etc.  So I decided to mention a few other things I am thankful for:

  • My knowledge of, and relationship with, Jesus Christ
  • My job
  • Modern medicine
  • Our country
  • Animals…not bugs…animals
  • Libraries

Additionally, at the beginning of the month I put several items in my workspace showing things I am thankful for:

  • My family
  • Blessings of the harvest
  • Family sitting down together for Thanksgiving dinner
  • Animals
  • My co-workers
  • Flowers
  • Our beautiful world
  • God and Jesus Christ
  • Prayer
  • Knowing that people we at first find fault with can become our dearest friends
  • Realizing that our choice of words and the language we use tells a lot about us

We bought some battery-operated candles and set them up in our room.  They add such a nice ambiance to the room.  I am surprised, perhaps it’s because we are close to the Christmas season, and we just watched that nice movie.

I have so much to give thanks to our Father in Heaven for!

What are you thankful for?

 

Blessings of Using Language Wisely


Here is a great quote about how our words and our language can affect others, as well as ourselves:

“Watch constantly for that which is worthy and noble in your fellowman.  It makes a person better to see and speak of good in his neighbor; while there is unbounded delight in observing the effect that a few words of appreciation and encouragement have upon men, women, and children with whom we associate.”  Joseph F. Smith, previous President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Just think what type of world we would have if everyone watched for the “worthy and noble” in others!  This would have all kinds of benefits:

  • You would see good that is happening all around you.
  • You would think about good more often.
  • It would give you ideas for how you can do good for others.
  • You would feel good more often.
  • Your problems would not seem as monumental – perhaps even turning from mountains into molehills.
  • You would start enjoying life again.
  • Others would react better to you and to others.
  • People would want to be around you more.
  • Life would be worth living.

What can you add to this list?

All of this would be compounded when we add respectful language to, and about, God.  For He pours blessings upon all those who remember Him, who pray (talk to) Him, and who use His name with reverence and respect.

God, your Father in Heaven, waits to bless you.  All you have to do is ask.  Talk with Him as you would with a loving father.  And be mindful of the ways you use His name.  And He will send so many blessings upon you that you will not have the capacity to hold them all.  Try it and see.  🙂

Thanksgiving Communications


November is a great month.  It seems that almost everyone’s thoughts start turning to what they are grateful for.

Not only do we enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday with all the trimmings that go along with it, but people throughout the world have similar celebrations, grateful for the harvest, food to eat, and the other things they enjoy in life.

And many people give thanks for their blessings to their God, the Bestower of all good things.

As I contemplated these thoughts over the last month or so, I thought of the communications we have with God, and also with each other.  It occurred to me that Thanksgiving is a great time to address those various communications.

We use communication to share thoughts, ideas, feelings, etc. with someone.  And we usually adjust the words we pick, the tone we choose, and the emphasis we use given the situation.

Often in life we find that we can become quite casual; over-communicative; perhaps use profanity when angry or trying to show off or stress our point; even throw around the name of Deity as a simple exclamation.

Unfortunately, these last two are happening more and more often, by women as well as by men, and even by our children in school.  This has to change.

How you communicate reflects who you are as a son or daughter of God. Clean and intelligent language is evidence of a bright and wholesome mind. Good language that uplifts, encourages, and compliments others invites the Spirit to be with you. Our words, like our deeds, should be filled with faith, hope, and charity.  As you do this you will have a better quality of life, more happiness, and greater blessings.

“Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good” Ephesians 4:29.

Always use the names of God and Jesus Christ with reverence and respect. Misusing the names of Deity is a sin. When you pray, address your Father in Heaven in reverent and respectful language. The Savior used such respectful language in the Lord’s Prayer (see Matthew 6:9–12).

Let’s encourage others to use clean language and receive the blessings that naturally follow.  🙂

Yes, Mormons Celebrate Thanksgiving


A dear friend, who know that I belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (otherwise know as the Mormons), asked me the other day if I celebrate Thanksgiving.

A great question!

Of course, most people throughout the world and throughout history have celebrated the harvest and given thanks to whatever God they believed in.

In the United States George Washington called for a day of thanksgiving after the battle of Trenton, a battle which saved the Revolution.  And when he became President, he called for an annual day of thanksgiving.

I’m glad we have Thanksgiving.  It’s good for us to take a moment once in a while and contemplate what we have to be thankful for.  It’s good for us, puts us in a different frame of mind.  It brings peace to our heart and our very soul.  It softens us and helps us remember what is truly important.

Taking time to thank God, our Heavenly Father, for those things brings humility.  Not humiliation, and not subservience.  But humility.

Humility is knowing we are God’s children and turning to Him in faith and in prayer.  It is trusting Him, believing (or trying to be believing) that He is there, that He loves us, and that He can, and will, help and guide us and our friends and loved ones.  Humility is turning to God and being teachable enough that we act on the inspiration that He sends to us.

If you ever wonder if a thought that comes to you is from God or not, there is a sure way to tell.  “For behold, the Spirit of Christ is given to every man, that he may know good from evil; wherefore, I show unto you the way to judge; for every thing which inviteth to do good, and to persuade to believe in Christ, is sent forth by the power and gift of Christ; wherefore ye may know with a perfect knowledge it is of God.

“But whatsoever thing persuadeth men to do evil, and believe not in Christ, and deny him, and serve not God, then ye may know with a perfect knowledge it is of the devil; for after this manner doth the devil work, for he persuadeth no man to do good, no, not one; neither do his angels; neither do they who subject themselves unto him.” Moroni 7:16-17.

There are many, many benefits to being thankful.  In fact, it is so important that members of the Church are taught from our early childhood on up to pray daily and always to thank Heavenly Father for the blessings He has given us.

Not only do we celebrate Thanksgiving, we essentially do it on a daily basis.  🙂

 

Happy Thanksgiving!


English: "The First Thanksgiving at Plymo...

English: “The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth” (1914) By Jennie A. Brownscombe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

It’s very interesting to note that no matter what country you live in, or what culture you are a part of, people the world over have a day of celebration and thankfulness for a good harvest.  It doesn’t strike me as strange at all.  It is quite natural!

 

As we reach the end of the harvest season, it is natural to be grateful for the food we have to eat.  Which leads us quite easily into the next step, that of thankfulness for our many others blessings – family, friends, our home, a good job, etc.

 

And thinking about these many blessings in our lives leads us to being thankful to the Creator of all these things and of us all, our Father in Heaven, whatever name by which we know Him!

 

He has truly blessed us, His children!